Tennessee White Cane Law

Title 55 Motor and Other Vehicles

Chapter 8; Operation of Vehicles - Rules of the Road

55-8-179 - Use of raised identifying cane or blaze orange dog leash restricted to blind or deaf persons - Penalties -

(a)   No person, unless totally or partially blind or otherwise incapacitated, while on any public street or thoroughfare shall carry in any raised or extended position any cane or similar walking stick colored white or white tipped with red.

(b)   No person, unless totally or partially deaf, shall carry, hold, or use on any street, highway, or in any other public place, a leash blaze orange in color on any dog accompanying such person.

(c)   A violation of this section is a Class C misdemeanor.

[Acts 1951, ch. 72, § 1 (Williams, § 2670.10); T.C.A. (orig. ed.), § 59-880; Acts 1980, ch. 488, § 1; 1989, ch. 591, § 113.]

55-8-180 - Pedestrians led by guide dog or carrying identifying cane given right of way - Penalty -

(a)   Whenever any pedestrian guided by a guide dog or dog on a blaze orange leash, or carrying in any raised or extended position a cane or similar stick white in color or white tipped with red, shall undertake to cross any public street or thoroughfare in this state, the driver of each and every vehicle approaching such pedestrian carrying such cane or stick or conducted by such dog shall bring such vehicle to a complete stop and before proceeding shall take all precautions necessary to avoid injuring such pedestrian; provided, that nothing herein shall be construed as making any person totally or partially blind or otherwise incapacitated guilty of contributory negligence in undertaking to cross any street or thoroughfare without being guided by a trained dog or carrying a cane or stick of the type above mentioned.

(b)   A violation of this section is a Class C misdemeanor.

[Acts 1951, ch. 72, § 2 (Williams, §§ 2670.11, 2670.12); T.C.A. (orig. ed.), § 59-881; Acts 1980, ch. 488, § 2; 1989, ch. 591, § 113.]

Follow this link to read a short history of the white cane written by Philip Strong. Phil was an advocate at the ACB office for pedestrian safety.